TAC: Community healthcare workers poorly trained, exploited

The TAC says community healthcare workers sacrifice their lives and deserve better from government.

Figures show the virus has claimed the lives of more than 30 million lives in the past 35 years. Picture: Masego Rahlaga/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - The Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) has challenged government to better train community healthcare workers and create permanent jobs for them, saying they are an important partner in the fight against Human Immuno Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (Aids).

Figures show the virus has claimed the lives of more than 30 million lives in the past 35 years.

TAC activists have gathered and marched at the Durban International Convention Centre where thousands of delegates have gathered to discuss ways of tackling the pandemic.

Today is day two of the conference.

The TAC and Section 27 activists started their briefing with a song, picketing from one point to the next, at the Durban International Conference Centre.



The group's Violet Kaseke says the fight has never stopped, and community healthcare workers must be recognised.

"In South Africa, we have 72,000 community healthcare workers, and I'm going to say this is not enough, but still the 72,000 that we have are people that have been poorly trained. They are exploited and pathetically paid."

She says community healthcare workers sacrifice their lives and deserve better from government.

The TAC, which was founded in 1998, has been credited with forcing a reluctant government led by former President Thabo Mbeki to start making Antiretroviral Treatment available to all South Africans living with HIV and Aids for free.

WATCH: TAC: Talk of ending Aids is misleading