IEC: SA should worry about violence leading up to elections

The IEC says violent protests leading up to the elections should not only worry all South Africans.

FILE: Residents of Atteridgeville set fire to tyres and dustbins along Maunde Street during protests against mayor elect Thoko Didiza. Picture: Thomas Holder/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) says it hopes political parties can keep their members disciplined and stop outbreaks of further violent protests.

Last week, residents in various parts of Tshwane protested, looted, and destroyed property after the African National Congress (ANC) announced Thoko Didiza as its mayoral candidate.

Five people were killed and many more were arrested.

WATCH: Arson, looting and vandalism in Tshwane over ANC mayoral candidate.

The IEC's Mosotho Moepya says violent protests leading up to the elections should not only worry the commission, but all South Africans.

"Particularly those who want to ensure that we have free and fair elections."

Deputy chairperson Terry Tselane says, "We will continue to monitor the situation and have conversations with the political parties concerned, to make sure that those types of issues are dealt with and we don't have those kind of challenges spilling into those processes."

The IEC has now confirmed that 200 parties and over 61,000 candidates are competing in this year's election.

INCIDENTS OF VIOLENCE ACROSS SA

There have been attacks on politicians and members of political parties ahead of the 2016 local government elections.

ANC activist Thabo Moroa was shot and killed at his home in Maboloka outside Brits in the North West on 18 June.

Two weeks ago, Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) and ANC members clashed over allegations by the red berets that the ruling party is behind the killings of two of its members at the Sethokga hostel in Tembisa.

It's understood the two members of the EFF were killed earlier this year during election campaigns.

To follow EWN' s interactive map on political attacks leading up to the local elections, click here.