NC residents call for clarity on SKA project’s impact

The SKA began its roadshow this week in Brandvlei to explain the process to affected communities.

Officials of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) are currently visiting several towns in the Northern Cape province to conduct community meetings.Picture: Natalie Malgas/EWN

CAPE TWON - Some Northern Cape residents are calling for clarity regarding the impact of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project in the area.

The expansive science project in the Karoo is expected to develop an additional 133 dish-like radio telescopes for astronomical research.

Officials of the SKA are currently visiting several towns in the province to conduct community meetings.

Science&Tech Dept conducting community meetings in Northern Cape ahead of policy amendments relating to #SKA. NM pic.twitter.com/RxMKlnajjp

The multi-billion rand international science project, built in the heart of the Karoo, is expected to swell to 197 dishes in the next five years. The project will enable scientists to see back to when the first stars were in the universe.

#SKA The multi-billion rand international science project expected in Northern Cape for next 50 years. NM

The dishes are so sensitive that no other radio frequency interference, such as cellphone connectivity, will be allowed.

Some farm land will also be acquired for the project.

The SKA began its roadshow this week in Brandvlei to explain the process to affected communities.

Public hearings will continue in Carnavon, Van Wyksvlei and Williston.