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Ndlozi video sparks struggle song nostalgia

Liberation songs are an ineffaceable part the South African struggle against an oppressive apartheid regime.

EFF spokesperson Mbuyiseni Ndlozi. Picture: Reinart Toerien/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - A video of Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) spokesperson Mbuyiseni Ndlozi singing at the party's first national assembly has resurfaced on Facebook, with many agreeing that his melodic voice evokes memories of a not-so-distant past.

In the video which went viral this week, Ndlozi sings Azania - a song which calls on 'fighters' to take back the land of the Freedom Charter, the party and its leader.

Liberation songs are an ineffaceable part of the South African struggle against an oppressive apartheid regime.

Throughout history, and in modern day South Africa, marches are characterised by masses chanting and moving in an almost synchronised wave - what we have come to know as toyi-toying.

Often charged with emotion and energy, the songs are used as motivation, a call to action or even to signify a historic moment in politics.

The lyrics and melody of the songs lend themselves to periodic adaptation to match public discourse, as in what have been dubbed the "Fallist Movements", where young people adapted struggle songs to voice their grievances about institutional racism, rape culture in tertiary institutions and high fees.

The students breathed new life into song about Mkontho Wesizwe operative Solomon Mahlangu.

WATCH: Students sing Solomon Mahlangu struggle song

The name of African National Congress leader Jacob Zuma has become synonymous with the song he sang during the controversial period when he had rape and corruption charges levelled against him - the lyrics of Umshiniwami, which when loosely translated mean " give me my machine gun", became satirical fodder.

WATCH: Jacob Zuma sings Umshiniwami

And former Democratic Alliance leader Helen Zille had a few clumsy attempts, and later promised the masses that she would never dance in public.

WATCH: Helen Zille toyi-toying at the DA re-launch

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