NSFAS to pilot a new funding model in 2017

The new funding model will have a relative means test to determine a family’s disposable income.

FILE: NSFAS says the R14.5 billion will not pay for those who don’t meet their means criteria this year. Picture: EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) says a new funding model will have a means test that will seek to address the so-called ' missing middle' by specialising in subsidies according to different income levels.

NSFAS says the R14.5 billion will not pay for those who don't meet their means criteria this year.

Instead, the new funding model, which be piloted next year, will have a relative means test to determine a family's disposable income.

NSFAS chairperson Sizwe Nxasana says the means test will have scientific models to determine if a household can afford university fees.

"We will look at, for instance, where the family spends their money, how many people they have [to take care of] and how much disposable income they have and so on."

Nxasana says the means test will also seek to address the high dropout rate of poor students from tertiary institutions.

He says the new model aims to provide more than just financial aid, but also life skills and psycho-social support for those coming from rural areas.

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