NSFAS advises universities on how to best allocate funds

NSFAS says the administering of funds will continue to be done by financial aid offices at universities.

FILE: A group of students at the University of Johannesburg protest the lack of NSFAS funding, 27 January 2014. Picture: EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) says vice-chancellors across the country have been advised on how to administer all the additional funding provided by government.

Yesterday, the African National Congress (ANC)'s' education subcommittee announced an additional R4,5 billion will be reprioritised to pay for students who previously failed to obtain loans.

The funding scheme says it's working on a new model that will be tested next year for full implementation in 2018.

Spokesperson Kagisho Mamabolo says the administering of funds will continue to be done by financial aid offices at universities.

"We have outlined how universities should make sure that all qualifying students are able to [benefit] from that money."

Mamabolo says the scheme has also made progress in collecting outstanding money from NSFAS beneficiaries.

"We've managed to categorise our debtors to employers and we know employers have employed most of our debtors and we are launching a nationwide campaign to make sure all employers know."

PARENTS WHO CAN AFFORD VARSITY FEES ARE URGED TO 'FORK OUT'

The ANC yesterday also urged parents of students who can afford tertiary education to pay the fees in the interests of social justice.

The party held a briefing where a subcommittee on education, health, science and technology gave feedback on its transformation gains in the wake of this year's fees must fall protests.

The ANC said in response to calls for no fee increases in 2016 government has provided R1,9 of the R2,3 billion shortfall agreed to by government last year.

Chairperson of the subcommittee Naledi Pandor said the ANC supports the ideal that if there are parents who can pay for tertiary education, they should.