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#Fees Must Fall: Wits hires private security to deal with disruptions

At the same time, Tuks has temporarily closed as students call for demonstrations against outsourcing.

Tuks is closed and may only reopen on Wednesday, as protesting students call for an end to outsourcing. Picture: Masa Kekana/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - While the University of South Africa (Unisa) has confirmed its reopened main and Sunnyside campuses after protests last week, Wits University says it's hired private security because its own campus control does not have the capacity to prevent disruptions.

A march to end outsourcing is currently underway by workers from the University of Pretoria (Tuks) and Unisa, as well as students supporting the cause.

Wits Vice Chancellor Adam Habib says since private security has been opened on campus, physical registration has taken place uninterrupted.

Unisa's spokesperson Martin Ramotshela said registration has resumed despite a protest at its Sunnyside campus earlier.

"There has not been any disruptions to our service and they have not really infringed on the rights of others to gain access to the university. It has been quite peaceful."

Habib says private security is needed on campus because the existing security measures are inadequate.

"The only way we could get it together was when we brought the private security on campus. Since Wednesday we've had 100 percent face-to-face registration."

The vice chancellors of all Gauteng universities are due to meet this afternoon to discuss the protests.

Meanwhile, Tuks has temporarily closed as protesting students call for solidarity demonstrations against outsourcing

Students have joined workers at the institution in demanding a monthly salary of R10,000 a month.

Cleaning staff say their employers currently pay them an average of R2,500 a month.

Student representatives and workers met with university management over the weekend to discuss their demands.

But the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) student commands Amla Monageng says nothing concrete came of the talks.

He says more pressure needs to be applied on management.

Police have closed off streets coming into the campus, while demonstrators remain at the university gates.

WATCH: #FeesMustFall reloaded

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