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Homo naledi cave may have had another entrance

An investigation into whether this is true could offer a new explanation for the so-called ‘burial chamber’.

FILE: Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa at the unveiling of the Homo naledi fossils. Picture: Christa Eybers/ EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - There are fresh calls for an investigation into whether the cave that contained all the Homo naledi fossils may have had a second entrance and whether this could offer a new explanation for the so-called 'burial chamber'.

Homo naledi is the latest human relative to be discovered in the Cradle of Humankind and has raised questions about the birth of consciousness.

New research published in the respected South African Journal of Science has attempted to date the fossils, suggesting that Homo naledi roamed the earth around two million years ago.

Dr Francis Thackeray has used a mathematical technique to compare Homo naledi skulls to other distant human relatives.

He says he would like to see more investigation into how the fossils got inside the so-called 'chamber of stars' cave.

"I would like Lee Berger and his team to do something that they haven't yet done, and that's ground penetrating radar on the hillside, in other words to determine for sure whether or not there might have been a second entrance."

Thackeray says if there was once another entrance, a family may have wandered inside the cave.

Berger and his team believe that despite being primitive, Homo naledi intentionally disposed of its dead, throwing bodies down a narrow chute and into the cave.

WATCH: The Homo naledi species which was unveiled to the world in Maropeng, has opened a door to a new debate on what makes humans unique.

To learn more about Homo naledi, _ click here_.