SAA secures court order against Business Day

Today’s lead story relates to a memorandum dating back to early this month, from SAA’s executive team.

FILE: South African Airways (SAA) has secured an interim court order instructing the newspaper to take down its lead story. Picture: Vumani Mkhize/EWN

CAPE TOWN - Business Day editor Songezo Zibi, says South African Airways (SAA) has secured an interim court order instructing the newspaper to take down its lead story.

In a series of tweets, Zibi explains the national carrier emailed the order to the Business Day's editorial team in the early hours of this morning.

#SAA are not saying our story is inaccurate. They're just arguing that the public should not know what is really going on there.

I am speaking to @RediTlhabi in the next few min about #SAA story we have been told to pull down from our website. It's also in print.

We now have #SAA's court papers. Essentially they are claiming that the document we referred to is "privileged". We shall go to court.

#SAA We were not able to argue the matter in court as we were not aware that SAA was approaching the courts last night.

#SAA The order was emailed at 1.47am, too late for us to cancel the print run as that takes place at 9.30pm.

But by that time it was too late for the newspaper to cancel its print run.

The front page of tomorrow's Business Day pic.twitter.com/pw4Jul3BhD

Today's lead story relates to a memorandum, dating back to early this month, from SAA's executive team to the company's broad warning the airline must secure an equity injection from the State or apply for business rescue.

Zibi claims he wasn't aware SAA was going to court.

CONCERNS

The ailing state of the national airline was put under the microscope by Members of Parliament.

SAA board chairwoman Dudu Myeni and new acting CEO Musa Zwane, were among a delegation who recently appeared before the finance and public enterprises committee, in the wake of SAA pilots delivering a vote of no confidence in SAA's leadership, concerns about the controversial airbus deal and the departure of top-level officials.

Last week, SAA also asked Treasury for a guarantee of between R4,5 billion so it can finalise its overdue financial statements as a going concern.

The amount depends on whether National Treasury agrees to its application to change the terms of a controversial deal with the airbus that could cost government R1,5 billion.

SAA is set to post a loss of R648 million for the first six months of the current financial year.

LISTEN: SAA pilots pass vote of no confidence in their bosses