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Rand coins no longer accepted in some Zimbabwean shops

Some shops are reported to be cashing in on the rand’s fall by applying two different exchange rates.

FILE: The rand was adopted along with the US in Zimbabwe in 2009. Picture: Christa Eybers/EWN.

HARARE - As the rand continues to slide, some shops in Zimbabwe are no longer accepting rand coins.

The rand was adopted along with the US in Zimbabwe in 2009, after the local dollar became worthless following months of hyperinflation.

It's hard to believe, given how suspicious Zimbabweans were when bond coins were introduced just last year.

But now Zimbabweans are pleading for more of the local coins to be put into the system, mostly because some shops no longer want rand coins.

Zimbabwe even imported rand coins last year to keep up with the demand for small change, but that was before South Africa's currency began to fall in value.

It's that slipping rate of exchange that's got retailers in Zimbabwe anxious: one 50 cent bond coin is no longer worth R5 as it was a few months ago.

Some shops are reported to be cashing in on the rand's fall by applying two different exchange rates: one for when you pay in rand, and one for when you're given rand as change.

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