'Insourcing at UCT could raise costs'

UCT management’s decision to insource previously outsourced services could bring costs up by R80m a year.

FILE: One of the demands protesting students have been calling for is an end to outsourcing at the university. Picture: Shamiela Fisher/EWN.

CAPE TOWN - The University of Cape Town (UCT) management's decision to insource previously outsourced services could bring costs up by nearly R80 million a year.

Earlier today, vice chancellor Max Price briefed the media on the way forward for the institution amid the Fees Must Fall movement.

One of the demands protesting students have been calling for is an end to outsourcing at the university.

Price says this is the amount the university is expected to incur due to the insourcing of services.

"We think that the extra costs will be in the region of R68 million to R70 million a year."

Price says UCT will insource six outsourced services, including cleaning, residence catering, gardening and campus security.

He adds the costs will be well worth it.

"It's a big cost, but it's one that we will have to weigh up against not only the costs of not doing this, in terms of being able to complete the exam, but especially in terms the situation the country's in around inequality."

Price says they will be lobbying government to help them cover the shortfall.

WATCH: UCT students protest over outsourcing

STUDENTS TAKE PROTEST TO PARLIAMENT AGAIN

Meanwhile, student protesters have marched to Parliament this afternoon, demanding to be addressed by the deputy higher education minister.

WATCH: #FeesMustFall student protesters disperse peacefully from Parliament. SS pic.twitter.com/CAaTUxiAsQ

Flanked by security, deputy minister Mduduzi Manana obliged.

Student representative Chumani Maxwele says even though fees have fallen, the fight is far from over.

"The question of outsourcing was never touched by the president; we've said that our struggle is linked with the workers."

WATCH: #FeesMustFall protesters outside Parliament. SS pic.twitter.com/pM2cOYy4Wq

When Manana came out, he was ordered to sit down.

#FeesMustFall "Please, we have elected you, you must sit down," deputy minister is told. He obliges. SS pic.twitter.com/rheqotaeJa

"Thank you for embarking on this struggle. There is no way as the ruling party in particular, we cannot associate or identify with this struggle."

Manana has promised his department will on Monday respond to the demands, which include a call for fees to fall in 2017.