Kya Sand: Police fire rubber bullets to disperse crowds

Earlier police had to step in when residents pelted stones at passing motorists and blocked some roads.

The scene of a protest in Kya Sand after tensions flared on 12 October 2015. Picture: Ziyanda Ngcobo/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - Police have opened fire with rubber bullets and teargas on a group of protesters in Kya Sand, in northwest Johannesburg this morning, after tensions flared up again.

Residents of the informal settlement have been demonstrating as demand houses they say were promised to them by the Gauteng government more than 20 years ago.

#KyaSand Police fired rubber bullets & dispersed teargas after an unknown group of men pelted stones at their cars pic.twitter.com/StYuDqECC8

Earlier, police had to step in when residents pelted stones at passing motorists and blocked some roads.

Community leader Lekgotla Modikoe says they're frustrated with the Gauteng government's failure to deliver RDP houses, which were promised to them many years ago.

Modikoe says they will march through the Msawawa informal settlement before stopping on Malibongwe Drive where they plan to block the roads

He says they will hand over a memorandum to the MEC highlighting their grievances.

"We're here because of the housing situation. For 22 years they've been promising us houses that we're going to get, so as a community we're frustrated. So we are prepared to give MEC Mamabolo a memorandum."

The metro police's Wayne Minaar urged motorists to avoid the area.

Police fired rubber bullets and dispersed the crowd after a group of men pelted stones at the residents preparing to march towards Witkoppen Road.

#KyaSand Residents are now preparing to march through the Msawawa informal settlement to Malibongwe dr. ZN pic.twitter.com/BL1lTny2Nd

#KyaSand Hundreds more have joined the march & are now making their way to Witkoppen road . ZN pic.twitter.com/08b7Ojodoz

Some journalists have also had to flee and duck for cover as chaos erupted with police trying to manage the crowd.

Hundreds of people carrying pangas, sjamboks and sticks sang and chanted as they prepared to march to hand over a memorandum of their grievances.

They're demanding to be included in the Lion Park development, which is set for completion in 2017.