Parly considers changing rules on motions without notice

The National Assembly’s rules sub-committee wants to prevent MPs from routinely objecting to every motion.

FILE: The sub-committee will now tweak the proposal before recommending it to the National Assembly’s rules committee for adoption. Picture: EWN.

CAPE TOWN - Member of Parliament (MPs) are considering changing Parliament's rules to prevent the abuse of motions without notice, traditionally used to record Parliament's messages of condolence or congratulation.

The National Assembly's rules sub-committee wants to prevent MPs from routinely objecting to every motion put before the house as the Economic Freedom Fighters has been doing in recent weeks.

The motions have also been used to filibuster.

The sub-committee is considering a proposal that could resolve the impasse over motions without notice.

It proposes that any motion without notice first be vetted by Parliamentary staff and garner the support of at least five political parties before it's read out in the house.

The motion also has to meet certain criteria.

The African National Congress' Juli Kilian said, "After we've gone through it, I think it could possibly work. The proof of the pudding will finally lie in the eating of it."

The sub-committee will now tweak the proposal before recommending it to the National Assembly's rules committee for adoption.