More charges could be laid as #Fifagate probe widens

The US & Swiss Justice Departments have given an update on a probe into alleged bribery at the football body.

The global football's governing body Fifa's headquarters in Zurich. Picture: AFP.

JOHANNESBURG - The United States and Swiss Justice Departments say more charges could be laid very soon as the investigation widens into the Fifa bribery scandal.

The US Attorney General, along with her Swiss counterpart gave an update on the investigation on Monday.

Fourteen officials were indicted by US Attorney General Loretta Lynch in May, with Lynch confirming that 10 are facing extradition.

Swiss Attorney General Michael Lauber says various officials have been questioned.

The world football governing body was first rocked by the scandal in June, with high ranking officials being charged.

Lauber says the US and Swiss authorities are not conducting a joint investigation, but that the two parties are cooperating with each other.

He's confirmed houses in the Swiss Alps have been searched, 11 terabytes of data seized and bank accounts investigated since the story broke in May.

SA IMPLICATED

South Africa has also been implicated in the scandal for allegedly paying a bribe to host the 2010 World Cup.

The US Justice Department states that bribes were paid to host the showpiece.

Top government and soccer officials have however denied this.

'THE WRONG SIDE OF PROGRESS'

Lynch says more individuals will be implicated in the scandal.

She says the investigation has widened and includes many countries.

"I've been gratified to see that the response to this problem has not been limited to one country, or even one continent. The problem of corruption on soccer is global, and we will remain vigilant in our efforts to support a global response."

The US Attorney General says those that refuse to reform will be brought down.

"All individuals involved in soccer must be committed to reform and to compliance with the rule of law."

She says, "To anyone who seeks to live in the past, and to return soccer to the days of corruption and bribery, cronyism and patronage; this global response sends a clear message. You are on the wrong side of progress."