Protea South hopeful electricity issue will be resolved

The MEC says the electrification project needs to be implemented to eradicate illegal power connections.

Gauteng Finance MEC Barbara Creecy visited Protea South residents in Soweto on Tuesday 7 July 2015, where she was shown how numerous houses are connected illegally. Picture: Masego Rahlaga/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - Gauteng Finance MEC Barbara Creecy on Tuesday said government's electrification project needs to be speedily implemented in other informal settlements so that illegal power connections can be eradicated.

Creecy visited Protea South residents in Soweto on Tuesday, where she was shown how numerous houses are connected illegally.

The MEC was also told by health workers at a local clinic that residents are increasingly re-routing electricity connections from the premises to their homes, leading to power trips that hit the facility.

Health workers at the Protea South Clinic said the illegal connections cause constant electricity outages which hamper their ability to treat patients.

#ServiceDelivery GP Finance MEC Barbara Creecy at the Protea Clinic in Soweto speaking to patients. MR pic.twitter.com/TGLx3Clysw

While some of the residents living in shacks have been equipped with prepaid meters, many others still have no legal connections and resort to crime.

Creecy said she will speak to Eskom and the City of Johannesburg about the problem soon.

"I think that Eskom is experiencing difficulties."

She said plans are afoot to equip more homes with prepaid electricity meters next month.

"I'm told that from August Eskom will be electrifying another 800 households."

The MEC will continue her Soweto imbizo on Thursday when she visits the Pimville area.