‘Shark attacks may be due to fish migration patterns’

Two University of Cape Town students were bitten in separate shark encounters this weekend.

FILE: 19-year-old Caleb Swanepoel lost his right leg in an attack yesterday while a 23-year-old sustained bite wounds on Friday. Picture: Grafixar/morguefile.com

CAPE TOWN - Marine experts say fish migration patterns may have led to an increase in shark activity along the Garden Route.

This comes after two University of Cape Town students were bitten in separate shark encounters in Buffels Bay and Plettenberg Bay this weekend.

19-year-old Caleb Swanepoel lost his right leg in an attack yesterday while a 23-year-old sustained bite wounds on Friday.

Both are recovering in hospital.

Shark Expert Dr. Allison Koch said, "What's likely the case is that there is an increase of sharks in that area possibly due to an increase in prey. So it is an unusual situation and therefore people need to be extra vigilant at this time."