Zuma: SA’s democracy inherited apartheid violence

Jacob Zuma addressed thousands of people at the Union Buildings in Pretoria yesterday.

FILE: President Jacob Zuma. Picture: GCIS

PRETORIA - With the country celebrating 21 years of freedom, President Jacob Zuma said South Africa's democracy inherited the violence of the apartheid regime and the country needs to move on and stop targeting foreigners.

Zuma addressed thousands of people at the Union Buildings in Pretoria yesterday.

He said South Africa owed its freedom to other countries on the continent which were homes to struggle stalwarts during apartheid.

Zuma said as the country prepares to celebrate Africa month in May, African unity and multiple cultures need to be promoted.

"We need to address the underlying causes of the violence and tension."

Zuma said South Africa didn't address the culture of violence after 1994.

"Apartheid was a violent system and therefore produced a violent counter to it."

The president said the country has made many improvements in the past 21 years but there are underlying issued in society that need to be dealt with.

Zuma also said South Africans must acknowledge that they're full of anger following the recent spate of xenophobic attacks in the country.

At least seven people were killed in recent xenophobic attacks which broke out in KwaZulu-Natal before spreading to Gauteng.

Government, religious leaders and entertainers have since come out to condemn the attacks.

At the same time, scores of immigrants are still leaving in camps following the attacks.