Repatriated Zimbabweans are ‘severely traumatised’

The returnees have brought with them torrid accounts of being attacked by xenophobic gangs in Durban.

FILE: A group of more than 400 Zimbabweans left Durban for their home country on 19 April 2015 in the wake of the xenophobic violence. Picture: EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - Zimbabwe's Ministry of Health says some of the more than 400 Zimbabweans who were repatriated to their country following the spate of xenophobic attacks in South Africa are "severely traumatised" and need special counselling.

The first batch of Zimbabweans fleeing xenophobia arrived in their country this week and many had harrowing tales to tell.

At least seven people have been killed in the recent attacks on foreigners in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

The army has been deployed to xenophobic hotspots stop the violence.

WATCH: Foreign nationals fear more attacks might occur

The Ministry says most of the returnees experienced horrific incidents.

The state run Chronicle newspaper says more than 100 of them have undergone specialised trauma counselling.

At least 18 are said to be severely traumatised.

The returnees have brought with them torrid accounts of being attacked by xenophobic gangs in Durban.

But it turns out a few of those who wanted to go home then changed their minds.

State media reports that 15 people got off the bus in Musina because they now felt safe.

Meanwhile, Professor Jonathan Jansen says the actions of a few do not speak for an entire nation.

LISTEN: 'All South Africans are not xenophobic'