Fishing Rights Allocation Process under scrutiny

The Public Protector’s office says it will now have to assess whether to launch a full-scale investigation.

FILE: The opposition party has called for the probe after two damning reports presented to Parliament in the last two weeks. Picture: Aletta Gardner/EWN

CAPE TOWN - The Public Protector's office says it will now have to assess whether to launch a full-scale investigation into the bungling of 2013's Fishing Rights Allocation Process after receiving a complaint from the Democratic Alliance (DA) this week.

The opposition party has called for the probe after two damning reports presented to Parliament in the last two weeks found alleged political interference in the issuing of licenses.

Former Fisheries Minister Tina Joemat-Petterson announced her decision to set the rights allocation process aside last year, because it was fatally flawed and would not hold up to a court challenge.

The Public Protector's spokesperson Oupa Segalwe says the request first has to be assessed.

"But on average, our assessment processes take up to five days, however, if the investigation team is of the view that more information is required, we embark on a preliminary investigation which seeks to establish whether there is a need to launch a full scale investigation."