Cold Case: Detective denies preferential treatment claims

The defence accused Gerhard Van Wyk of double standards when dealing with suspects.

State witness and investigating officer in the Betty Ketani murder trial, captain Gerhard van Wyk. Picture: Alex Eliseev/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - The investigating officer in the Betty Ketani murder case has today denied claims from the defence that some suspects received preferential treatment.

Captain Gerhard van Wyk spent his fifth day on the witness stand testifying in the so-called cold case.

He explained how he gathered evidence against three men accused of killing Ketani 15 years ago in a crime detailed in a hidden confession.

Defence advocate Laurance Hodes accused Van Wyk of double standards when dealing with suspects.

Gesturing to the court, Hodes claimed the detective clutched at pieces of his investigation which suited his case.

Van Wyk denied this and calmly explained how his docket was compiled and why certain leads were followed while others were abandoned.

The defence in this case claims the owner of Cranks restaurant in Rosebank, Eric Neeteson-Lemkes is framing those in the dock.

Ketani worked at the restaurant until she vanished without a trace.

Earlier, the defence claimed the s hallow grave where bones were found was contaminated and has accused the police of letting civilians make arrests and seize important evidence.

Van Wyk inherited the case from another group of detectives but defended the investigation.

"We often make use of private investigators to assist us with investigations. They also request us to assist them with investigations."