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2 metre Cape cobra takes a dip at Hout Bay Beach

Snake and reptile education expert, Shaun Macleod, said Cape cobras don’t normally grow that big.

A nearly two metre long Cape cobra spent the afternoon on Hout Bay beach on 10 November 2014. Picture: Jeffery Rinks.

CAPE TOWN - A nearly two metre-long Cape cobra spent the afternoon at Hout Bay Beach.

Photos have been posted on social media of the reptile slithering along Hout Bay Beach earlier today.

Snake and reptile education expert, Shaun Macleod, earlier told 567 CapeTalk that Cape cobras don't normally grow that big.

Macleod said that it's not unusual for the reptile to go into water.

"They soak themselves in the water when they are about to shed their skin, so their skin gets irritated."

Asked how dangerous it could have been for people to come into contact with the cobra, the snake expert said it's not very dangerous.

"The only time it would be dangerous is if you physically tamper with it, 98% of people who are bitten by snakes are bitten because of self-infliction. In most times, the snakes won't attack you but will move away from you."

Snakes in the Pacific Islands region are known to travel from island to island.

The news of the cobra also reached the Twittersphere, where people expressed their shock at the size of the reptile:

Cape cobra? Yhoo! " @thabangm: It's not a snake, it's a Cape Cobra. Calling it a snake is like calling a Lion a cat."

This must have been an impressive sight to see, especially the size of this Cape Cobra snake on Hout Bay beach... http://t.co/wzVio0YCuE

Let's say it's me strolling on that beach when I see @Cape_Cobra. I would hv screamed so much it'd have played till rescued

Massive Cape Cobra going for a swim on hout beach, yes people this is Africa! pic.twitter.com/yEGYkL9w9T

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