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World Cup protests get heated

While some protesters interrogated cops and bystanders, others stripped.

While some protesters interrogated cops and bystanders, others stripped. Picture: Christa Eybers/EWN.

SAO PAULO - Brazilians are making a habit of protesting every time their national team takes to the field.

While some protesters interrogated cops and bystanders, others stripped.

However, a favourable ratio of police to protestors ensured the rally remained passive.

Thousands of angry protesters marched through the streets of Sao Paulo to express their disdain for the ongoing Fifa World Cup in Brazil on 23 June 2014. Picture: Christa Eybers/EWN.

Hundreds of protesters made their way up to Paulista Avenue in São Paulo to once again show their disgust at Fifa.

Protesters disrupted traffic and intimidated football supporters as they sang anti-World Cup songs and held banners condemning Fifa's actions.

Dozens of policeman, wearing knee-guards, riot shields, helmets and batons made sure that the crowd behaved.

Some policemen were on horseback, in 4x4 vehicles or parked in the middle of the road to make sure that none of the protesters leave this particular area.

Drums were played in the background with helicopters flying overhead as manifestos, displaying and outlining their thoughts on the World Cup, were handed out by some protesters.

A big red banner was held over the street blocking traffic, saying 'We will not be repressed'.

One woman got right in the face of a policeman, fell to her knees in disgust and eventually took her shirt off, throwing it at the police and then crying, telling them to get out.

Another woman asked a policeman to put his weapon down and treat everyone like human beings.

Tempers, however, remained in check as a heavy police presence stopped any protesters getting out of hand.

Watch: Anti-World Cup protest as Brazil takes the field

Last week close to 1,000 protesters took the streets of Sao Paulo in anger of Brazil's hosting of the World Cup.

Dressed in black balaclavas and gas masks, demonstrators intimidated bystanders before vandalising nearby shops and banks. Protesters shot projectiles at banks and nearby restaurants.

They marched with banners which read 'Fifa are terrorists'.

Transporting dummies hanging from nooses, they linked arms as they brought traffic to a standstill.

Brazilian flags were vandalised with profanities and the word 'corruption' painted across it.

Protestors were once again chanting 'Nao vai ter copa' which means, 'No to the cup'.

There was little police presence to maintain law and order.

Visit EWN's Soccer World Cup 2014 Portal.