EFF promises new welfare grant

The party says if it is elected in Gauteng, terminally ill patients will receive a grant of R2,500.

The EFF launched its Gauteng manifesto on 24 April. Picture: EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - With just 12 days to go until this year's general elections, the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) has promised the introduction of a new social welfare grant for terminally ill citizens in a bid to win votes.

The party yesterday l aunched its Gauteng manifesto with premier candidate Dali Mpofu saying that the development of poor people will unapologetically happen at the expense of the rich.

Mpofu committed to an action plan which would see a provincial land audit completed in about three months and the introduction of the so-called terminally ill grant.

He attempted to sweeten the deal for this year's voters, saying he would take drastic action if his plan to improve the lives of the poor is ignored.

"If it isn't performed properly, I can assure you that heads will start to role even within the first 100 days."

He said if the EFF is elected, all South Africans with terminally ill diseases will receive a grant of R2,500 regardless of their past.

The EFF says it's now in its final phase of its election campaign but its supporters can still contribute to its manifesto.

MALEMA BRUSHES ASIDE MCKENZIE ATTACK

EFF leader Julius Malema on Thursday brushed aside a scathing open letter by Patriotic Alliance leader Gayton McKenzie.

In the letter, McKenzie accused the politician of being a thief.

The Patriotic Alliance leader, who is an ex-convict, wrote to Malema on Wednesday calling him a false revolutionary and a danger to South Africa.

The letter delivered a number of insults against the EFF leader.

McKenzie tore into Malema's claims of trying to inspire the poor by wearing clothes worth thousands of rands, arguing the poor have no reason to trust the firebrand politician.

But Malema said McKenzie is just angry and is free to vent, saying it's probably because the businessman has realised it's much harder to run a political party than a nightclub.

The EFF leader said the country's poor will decide for themselves whether he is making false promises when it comes to the 7 May elections.