African journalists dodge daily threats

The comments were made at the International Press Institute (IPI)’s World Congress in Cape Town.

FILE: Several investigative journalists in Africa have described how exposing corruption is a life threatening exercise. Picture: Vumani Mkhize/EWN.

CAPE TOWN - Several investigative journalists in Africa on Monday described how exposing corruption is a life-threatening exercise.

The comments were made at the International Press Institute (IPI)'s World Congress in Cape Town.

Journalists from Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ghana have detailed how investigative journalism is a daily struggle.

A veil covers the face of an investigative journalist from Ghana as he gives details of how careful he has to be while exposing corruption.

He says he had been victimised and had to move in the shadows to stay alive.

Sierra Leone journalist Sorious Samura compared investigative journalism to an onion, saying the closer one gets to the heart of the story, the more it stings the eyes.

Both journalists agree they will continue to seek the truth and face danger if it benefits their countrymen.

Earlier on Monday, a Liberian investigative journalist said although she often fears for her safety, she won't be deterred from exposing the practice of female genital mutilation.

FrontPage Africa's Mae Azango exposed the traditional practice, which resulted in the deaths of many young girls annually.