More parents opt for home schooling

The Centre for Home Education says home schooling is becoming popular in South Africa.

The Centre for Home Education says home schooling is becoming popular in South Africa.

CAPE TOWN - The Centre for Home Education says home schooling is becoming popular in South Africa.

According to Census 2011, 56,857 families were home schooling their children.

Centre for Home Education's Leendert van Oostrum told the Redi Tlhabi Show that home schooling was becoming popular throughout the continent.

"It is becoming more viable around the world in fact because school systems are in deep trouble around the world. More and more people are opting for home education, including in Africa. I attended an East African conference on home schooling two weeks ago in Nairobi. It was unbelievable to see how it has exploded in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, even in Ghana and Nigeria."

Van Oostrum says some families opt for home schooling due to concerns over the quality of education.

"The single most important reason cited by families is indeed the quality of education. They believe they can give their children a better quality of education than schools can generally do."

He says violence in schools also plays a major factor.

Last week, a pupil lost his life in KwaZulu-Natal after he was stabbed by robbers outside Roseville Secondary School.

He said families also want to educate their children within the family philosophy or religion.

Meanwhile, Basic Education's Dr Moses Simelane says the department has nothing against home schooling.

"The fact that as a country we have legislated the provision of home schooling is one way of mobilising parents to play a role in the education of their children. Whether they are educated in schools or in the home setting, parents have to play a role.'

However, he says parents should do what is best for the child.

"Whatever option is taken by the parent it should be in the best interest of the child. If it's for any reasons other than what is in the best interest of the child, then it becomes problematic."