The Africa Report: 13 January

EWN’s Africa Correspondent Jean-Jacques Cornish reports on the day’s top African news

Rwandan President Paul Kagame. Picture: AFP.

RWANDA'S PAUL KAGAME: CRUEL WORDS BUT NO MEA CULPA

In an apparent reference to the murder of his former spy boss Patrick Karegeya, Rwandan President Paul Kagame has warned that treason brings consequences.

Karegeya, who was granted political asylum in South Africa, was found strangled at the Michelangelo Towers in Sandton on New Year's Day.

During a prayer breakfast in the Rwandan capital Kigali, Kagame made controversial and insensitive remarks about Karegeya.

Kagame described how Karegeya deserved to die, threatened those who wished his people ill, and stated Rwandans felt no sympathy for Karegeya's death.

He stopped short of claiming responsibility for ordering the murder.

Kagame has however made his disdain for South Africa clear stating Rwandans should ignore reports from "another country".

This is most likely in reference to government's statement promising to find Karageya's killers.

Bilateral relations between Rwanda and South Africa have been tense since the attempted murder of another Rwandan political exile.

Former Lieutnant General Faustin Kayumba Nyamwasa was shot in the stomach in South Africa in June 2010.

US TO PRESS FOR RELEASE OF SOUTH SUDANESE REBELS TO ATTEND PEACE TALKS

In an effort to further peace talks, a United States special envoy has urged the South Sudanese government to release all rebel leaders.

Special envoy Donald Booth met with so-called rebel leader Riek Machar in an effort to persuade him to take part in the peace talks.

The offer was declined, with a rebel spokesperson later stating that the peace talks would only be attended once their associates were released.

The spokesperson also denied any rebel attacks on oil installations in Unity State.

South Sudan's crucial oilfields are in large part the motivation for China's direct involvement in the peace talks.

Fighting in the world's youngest nation began on 15 December between forces loyal to President Salva Kiir and those loyal to former deputy president Machar.

More than 1,000 people have been killed and the fighting has intensified since.

LIBYAN DEPUTY MINISTER GUNNED DOWN ON THE WAY HOME

Gunmen have killed Libya's Deputy Industry Minister in a drive-by shooting.

Minister Hassan al-Drowi was on his way home to Sirte on Saturday evening when a car drove by and gunmen opened fire, shooting several times.

The attack on the minister is one of many by the powerful militia, an aftermath of the fall of Brother Leader Muammar Gaddafi.