The Africa Report: 4 November

EWN’s Africa Correspondent Jean-Jacques Cornish reports on the day’s top African news

Civilians in the DRC have been displaced by ongoing violence.

KILLING OF FRENCH JOURNALISTS, A COLD BLOODED ASSASSINATION

The French Foreign Minister has labelled the killing of two French journalists in Mali on Saturday a "cold-blooded assassination".

Two French radio journalists were killed by gunmen in northern Mali on Saturday after being abducted in the city of Kidal.

Both journalists had made their way to Mali in July to cover the first round of the presidential elections.

51-year-old Ghislaine Dupont and 58-year-old Claude Verlon were abducted in Kidal after finishing an interview with Ambeiry Ag Rhissa, a local official with the MNLA Tuareg.

The two journalists were abducted, driven approximately 15 kilometres and shot.

The shooting occurred in close proximity to a location housing United Nations and French troops and was right on the fault line between the Tuareg and Malian nationals.

Kidal is the birthplace of the 2012 Tuareg uprising that paved the way for an al-Qaeda takeover and the eventual French intervention.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius has labelled the murders a cold-blooded assassination and French President Francois Hollande has strongly condemned the attack.

More than 1000 journalists have been killed in Africa while on assignment in the past two decades.

GOVERNMENT FORCES CLOSE IN ON DRC REBELS COINCIDING WITH PRETORIA SUMMIT

Leaders from both the Great Lakes regions and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) are meeting in Pretoria, coinciding with military success in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

Over the weekend, the DRC's national army recaptured a town in the volatile east, Bunagana, from M23 rebels.

Last Monday, United Nations Special Envoy in the DRC, Martin Kobler, reported back to the international body that M23 was "all but finished".

The recapture of Bunagana is yet another success in ending M23's reign of terror in the east.

The summit in Pretoria, which begins on Monday, follows the military victory.

South Africa will host the SADC-organised summit as well as play an integral part in issues of strategy and finance relating to agreements made between the two regions.

THE LUCRATIVE BUSINESS OF PIRACY

The World Bank has reported that pirates operating around the Horn of Africa have raked in $413 million in ransoms since 2005.

This may appear to be a lucrative business for pirates but it is the consequences thereof which are most worrying.

A large bulk of the income is responsible for financing organised crime on a global scale.

The World Bank, along with Interpol and the United Nations, have begun investigating the flow of income from pirates to the organised crime world.

The trio have called on all nations, particularly the Horn of Africa nations and the Gulf of Guinea, to commit to work together.