20°C / 22°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 11°C
  • Fri
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 16°C
  • 10°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 34°C
  • 19°C
  • Sat
  • 32°C
  • 20°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 19°C
  • Mon
  • 36°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 37°C
  • 19°C
  • Thu
  • 31°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 36°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 22°C
  • Sun
  • 33°C
  • 19°C
  • Mon
  • 34°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 27°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 25°C
  • 18°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 23°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 10°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 10°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 9°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 14°C
  • 7°C
  • Thu
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 16°C
  • 11°C
  • Tue
  • 14°C
  • 9°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 36°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 32°C
  • 22°C
  • Sun
  • 33°C
  • 19°C
  • Mon
  • 35°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 37°C
  • 20°C
  • Thu
  • 28°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 31°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 32°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 11°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 35°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 31°C
  • 19°C
  • Mon
  • 38°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 40°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 11°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 11°C
  • Sat
  • 25°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 9°C

Morsi: I'm still Egypt's president

Ousted Egyptian leader Mohamed Morsi struck a defiant tone on the first day of his trial.

Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi. Picture: AFP.

CAIRO - Ousted Egyptian leader Mohamed Morsi struck a defiant tone on the first day of his trial on Monday, chanting 'Down with military rule', and calling himself the country's only 'legitimate' president.

Morsi, an Islamist who was toppled by the army in July after mass protests against him, appeared angry and interrupted the session repeatedly, prompting a judge to adjourn the case.

Opponents of Egypt's army-backed government say the trial is part of a campaign to crush Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood movement and revive a police state.

It is the second time in just over two years that an overthrown president has been in court in Egypt, a nation said by government critics to have reverted to authoritarian rule.

The trial is not being aired on state television and journalists were barred from bringing their telephones into the courtroom set up in a Cairo police academy.

Morsi made a Brotherhood hand gesture to express his disgust at a crackdown on a protest camp that was razed by security forces in August.

"This trial is illegitimate," said Morsi, prompting the judge to adjourn the session. Proceedings are expected to resume later on Monday.

The now-banned Muslim Brotherhood has said it will not abandon the street protests it has staged to pressure the army to reinstate him.

But a heavy security presence across the country served as a reminder of a crackdown in which hundreds of Morsi supporters were killed and thousands more rounded up.

UNCERTAINTY

The uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak in 2011 had raised hopes that Egypt would embrace democracy and human rights and eventually enjoy economic prosperity.

The trial of Morsi is likely to be the next flashpoint in their confrontation, which has hammered tourism and investment.

He and 14 other Islamists face charges of inciting violence relating to the deaths of about a dozen people in clashes outside the presidential palace in December after Morsi enraged his opponents with a decree expanding his powers.

Morsi travelled to the heavily guarded courthouse from an undisclosed location by helicopter, state media said.

Hundreds of Morsi supporters gathered outside the building to pledge their support for him. One sign read "The will of the people has been raped", a reference to the army takeover.

Tahrir Square was sealed off by army personnel carriers and barbed wire.

Traffic was light in the usually bustling Cairo, suggesting many stayed home for fear of violence.

The Brotherhood had won every election since Mubarak's fall and eventually propelled Mursi into power after the Islamist movement endured repression under one dictator after another.

But millions of Egyptians who grew disillusioned with Morsi's troubled one-year rule took to the streets this summer to demand his resignation. They accused Morsi of usurping power and mismanaging the economy, allegations he denied.

The army, saying it was responding to the will of the people, deposed Morsi and announced a political road map it said would lead to free and fair elections.

But the promises have not reassured Egypt's Western allies, who had hoped the military men's grip on power would be broken.

CALL FOR OBJECTIONS

The Brotherhood has called on its supporters to stage mass protests on Monday, but the size of their demonstrations has shrunk because of heavy policing.

Security forces have killed hundreds of Islamists and arrested thousands, including the Brotherhood's top leaders.

Egyptian officials admit the path to democracy has been rocky, but say a proper political transformation will take time.

Egypt has also faced a sharp escalation of attacks by Islamist militants in the Sinai Peninsula. Security forces are attacked almost daily.

Speaking to Reuters by phone, Osama Morsi, the deposed president's 30-year-old son, said his father had not authorised a defence lawyer and the family would not attend the trial. "We do not acknowledge the trial. We are proud of my father and feel strong about his position."

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus