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The Africa Report: 1 November

EWN’s Africa Correspondent Jean-Jacques Cornish reports on the day’s top African news.

An oil platform of the US Pride company situated off the Angolan coast. Picture: Marcel Mochet/AFP

Following a falling out between Angola and Portugal, the French have shown keen interest in becoming the African nation's principal business partner.

After indirect accusations of corruption, Angolan president Jose Eduardo dos Santos has made remarks hinting toward the country's divestment from Portugal.

According to recent statements, it would seem that Angola is contemplating partnering with China who has already invested approximately $15 billion in various economic agreements.

Despite strong competition from the Chinese, and still former colonialists Portugal, France has expressed their desire for a stake in Angola's "miracle" economy.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, along with an impressive business delegation, is in the African country.

The business delegation includes heads of Air France, BNP Paribas, Airbus, and Total.

The delegation and the Minister will look to persuade the Angolans to divest from Portugal and make them the principal business partner.

However, many within the French business community are questioning the accuracy of the "miracle" that is Angola's economic boom.

MALI COUP LEADER TO FACE TRIAL

The Malian soldier who led the March 2012 coup d'état is set to stand trial over the alleged violence committed by those under his authority.

Amadou Sanogo is responsible for leading the coup that saw the overthrow of ousted president, Amadou Toumani Toure.

This ultimately paved the way for the al Qaeda takeover in the north of Mali and the subsequent intervention by French troops to force the terrorist organisation out.

Newly-elected Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta is adamant Sanogo stand trial for the excesses of the men under his command.

Sanogo's promotion to lieutenant-general was surrounded with controversy.

He skipped six ranks, prompting an attempted mutiny by disgruntled fighters.

The mutiny was quickly suppressed by Sanogo proponents.

The charges brought against Sanogo include the deaths of the mutineers and deaths elsewhere in the country.

NIGER TO STOP WOMEN AND CHILDREN FROM CROSSING SAHARA

Niger has announced they will begin efforts to stop the crossing of the Sahara by their women and children.

This follows Tuesday's tragedy where 92 bodies recovered in the Sahara.

Two vehicles were carrying Niger nationals desperate to gain entry to Europe via Algeria.

The vehicles broke down and majority of the migrants died of thirst.

Contributing to Niger's urgent attempt to stop this type of movement is that many of those who do not gain entry to Europe end up begging on the streets of Algeria.

It is not yet known how Niger will tackle this issue, which far too often results in tragedy, because of the Sahara's porous borders.

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