CT shuts down notorious ganghouse

The dilapidated mint green house is filled with broken bottles and stained furniture.

After a lengthy legal battle the city is claiming back the so-called Little House on the Prairie, a drug den allegedly operated by gang-boss Quinton 'Mr Big' Marinus. Picture: Mia Spies/EWN

CAPE TOWN - The City of Cape Town is shutting down an infamous Belhar ganghouse linked to a string of illegal activities.

After a nine-year legal battle the city is claiming back the so-called Little House on the Prairie after the occupants agreed to leave on Thursday.

The property owned by the council was allegedly operated by alleged crime high-flyer Quinton Marinus, also known as Mr Big.

The dilapidated mint green house is filled with broken bottles and stained furniture.

Its walls are crumbling and the stench of urine hangs heavy in the air.

The house has long been regarded as a hot bed for criminal activities since the early 1990s.

The city's JP Smith says after a legal battle that ended in the Constitutional Court, the municipality will take back the property.

The city also wants to take legal action against tenant Jeffrey Blankenberg and hopes to use the action to send out a decisive message.

BELHAR RESIDENTS SAD TO SEE IT GO

At the same time, although authorities are relieved that they have cracked down on the infamous Belhar house, some residents are sad to see the property being targeted by law enforcement.

Although law enforcers believe that the end of the infamous house will change the community for the better, some residents are disappointed and say it was not only their hang out, but also their place of employment.

Police on the scene say the property will now be treated as a crime scene to investigate allegations of murders that might have taken place over the years and the possibility of bodies buried on the property.

Smith says the house will be used by law enforcers and special units including disaster risk management and traffic services to protect and uplift the community.