Kids orphaned by Boeremag have moved on

Claurina Mokone was killed 11 years ago by a Boeremag bomb in Soweto.

Boeremag accused Andre du Toit (left) and his brother accused Mike du Toit speak to their lawyer in court. Picture: Barry Bateman/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - More than a decade after a Boeremag bomb killed their mother, the two orphans of the Soweto woman hit by shrapnel appear to have moved on with their lives.

It was 11 years ago that a chunk of blown-up railway track smashed into the shack in Soweto where Mary and Joseph Mokone were sleeping with their mother Claurina.

The 42-year-old single mother from Lesotho died on the scene.

The Democratic Alliance's Dene Smuts is the founding trustee of the Mokone Children's Trust, which was setup to help the pair.

She says Joseph is currently studying at university, while Mary achieved a business qualification and is working in the private sector.

Smuts asked that the siblings be left in peace, to deal with news of judgment handed down on their mother's killers.

BOEREMAG SENTENCED

Five Boermag members from the group's bomb squad who planned to kill former President Nelson Mandela, received the heaviest punishment.

Justice was meted out in the North Gauteng High Court more than 10 years after the trial started.

Judge Eben Jordaan handed down prison terms ranging from five to 35 years, but some were wholly suspended.

Jordaan also took into consideration some men had already spent as much as 11 years behind bars.

Some accused and their lawyers left the court relieved, while some of the men and their families sobbed.

Este du Toit, whose husband Mike will serve another 10 years behind bars, believes the justice system has treated the Boeremag unfairly.

"I think it's terrible and I think all of them could have come out after the 10 years they served already and they could have got a shorter sentence."

Boeremag leader Tom Vorster and the four members of the bomb squad each received an effective 25-year sentence.

A total of five Boeremag members walked out of the court free men for playing relatively minor roles in the plot.