The Africa Report: 29 October

EWN’s Africa correspondent Jean-Jacques Cornish reports on the day’s top African news

The head of the M23 rebel military forces, Brigadier-General Sultani Makenga. Picture: AFP.

M23 REBELS ARE "ALL BUT FINISHED"

A United Nations (UN) Special Envoy has reported that the M23 rebels in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are "all but finished".

On Monday, Martin Kobler, the UN Special Envoy for the DRC, said the rebel movement had been reduced to a small triangle close to the Rwandan border.

Kobler's claim follows the fall of the fifth area held by M23 on Monday.

Although the news is welcomed, the rebel movement has been written off once too many.

Meanwhile, the UN Organisation Stabilisation Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO) continues with their offensive operations and stabilisation activities.

Countries contributing to MONUSCO include Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and South Africa.

South Africa's President Jacob Zuma will arrive in the DRC on Tuesday along with Foreign Affairs Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane.

Nkoana-Mashabane will be discussing security in the volatile eastern DRC with her Angolan and Congolese counterparts.

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DOZENS DIE OF THIRST CROSSING SAHARA TO GET TO EUROPE

At least five migrants have died of thirst while trying to cross the Sahara to get into Europe.

On Monday, authorities in Niger reported that two vehicles full of migrants had attempted to cross the Sahara to find their way into Europe.

The two vehicles broke down, leaving at least five people dead with 35 people remaining missing.

The attempt to enter Europe is understood to have happened two weeks ago.

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ICC WANT KENYATTA TRIED IN THE HAGUE

Prosecutors of the International Criminal Court have made clear their intentions to see Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta attend his war crimes trial in The Hague.

This comes despite continuous calls by Kenyan authorities and members of the African Union for the postponement of Kenyatta's trial.

The trial, which sees Kenyatta face war crimes charges, is due to begin in November.

Kenyan authorities and AU member-states have requested either a postponement of a year for Kenyatta's trial or for the ICC to try him in absentia.

Justification for this request is that the Kenyan constitution makes no provision for a stand-in president, leaving the government paralysed.

The ICC has already denied the request that the trial be postponed despite the terrorist threat in east Africa.

Kenyan authorities have also put their case to the United Nations Security Council but the ICC prosecutors are adamant Kenyatta be present in The Hague for the full duration of the trial.