Germany, France seek clarity from US

United States spying operations are likely to dominate a meeting of EU leaders.

US President Barack Obama. Picture: AFP.

BRUSSELS - German and French accusations that the United States has run spying operations in their countries, including possibly bugging Chancellor Angela Merkel's mobile phone, are likely to dominate a meeting of EU leaders starting on Thursday.

The two-day Brussels summit, called to tackle a range of social and economic issues, will now be overshadowed by debate on how to respond to the alleged espionage by Washington against two of its closest European Union allies.

For Germany the matter is particularly sensitive. Not only does the government say it has evidence the chancellor's personal phone was monitored, but the very idea of bugging dredges up memories of eavesdropping by the Stasi secret police in the former East Germany, where Merkel grew up.

Following leaks by data analyst Edward Snowden, which revealed the reach of the US National Security Agency's vast data-monitoring programmes, Washington finds itself at odds with a host of important allies, from Brazil to Saudi Arabia.

In an unusually strongly worded statement on Wednesday evening, Merkel's spokesman said the chancellor had spoken to President Barack Obama to seek clarity on the spying charges.

"She made it clear that she views such practices, if proven true, as completely unacceptable and condemns them unequivocally," the statement read.

White House spokesman Jay Carney said Obama had assured Merkel that the United States "is not monitoring and will not monitor" the chancellor's communications, leaving open the possibility that it had happened in the past.

A White House official declined to say whether Merkel's phone had previously been bugged. "I'm not in a position to comment publicly on every specific alleged intelligence activity," the official said.

German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle has summoned the US ambassador to Berlin to discuss the issue.

Germany's frustration follows outrage in France since_ Le Monde newspaper_ reported the NSA had collected tens of thousands of French phone records between December 2012 and January 2013.

President Francois Hollande has made it clear he plans to put the spying issue on the summit agenda, although it is not clear what that will ultimately achieve.