The Africa Report: 16 October

EWN’s Africa Correspondent Jean-Jacques Cornish reports on the day’s top African news

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor.

ANGOLAN PRESIDENT LASHES OUT AT PORTUGAL

Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos has lashed out at Portugal for probing the finances of Angolan officials.

The Portuguese government has been looking into Angolan officials' finances and have reported finding of numerous acts of corruption at state level.

Dos Santos has hit back at the Portuguese saying they are encouraging the perception that a rich African is corrupt.

The Angolan president said the country's ties with Portugal were now under strain.

Despite dos Santos's claim that he and his officials are not guilty of these allegations, Transparency International, the global NGO that monitors corporates and governments, ranks Angola as one of the most corrupt in the world.

It is alleged that out of every $5 made from oil production in Angola, at least $1 lands in the pockets of the dos Santos family.

ZAMBIA ISSUES ARREST WARRANT FOR THREE FOOTBALL PLAYERS

Zambian authorities have issued arrest warrants for three football players that did not make their friendly against China.

The trio, Rainford Kalaba, Stoppila Sunzu and Nathan Sinkala - who all play for the Democratic Republic of Congo's TP Mazembe - claimed they were injured and unable to perform their national duties.

However, the Zambian interim coach, Patrice Beaumelle, suspected the trio were lying and had them tested.

After finding out the three players were fit and healthy, the Zambian FA took their passports.

The trio managed to sneak over the border and return to the DRC, prompting Zambian authorities to issue arrest warrants.

FORMER LIBERIAN STRONGMAN CHARLES TAYLOR STARTS JAIL SENTENCE IN BRITAIN

Former Liberia President Charles Taylor has begun his stay in Britain, where he is serving out a 50-year sentence.

Taylor had unsuccessfully appealed against his 50 year sentence earlier this month.

He was sentenced to 50 years by a United Nations special court for Sierra Leone for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Taylor is expected to appeal serving his sentence in Britain, having asked that he be relocated to Rwanda to be closer to his family.

Taylor, the first head of state to be found guilty of crimes against humanity since the Nuremberg Trials, has already served one of the 50 years for his crimes against neighbouring Sierra Leone.