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Outa's case 'very strong'

The Supreme Court of Appeal is due to hear Outa's case against e-tolling today.

Outa's Wayne Duvenage. Picture: Taurai Maduna/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - The Opposition to Urban Tolling Alliance (Outa) says it's confident with its case against the controversial e-tolling project which it will present today at the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) in Bloemfontein.

Outa is fighting to stop the multibillion Rand project from launching and is now appealing a judgment that went against it in December last year.

The alliance's Wayne Duvenage says the case is about showing civil society that massive government projects can be challenged.

"We are very confident. The case is very strong and we've maintained that all along. We wouldn't have gotten the interdict in April last year if it wasn't a strong case."

There's still no clarity on when e-tolling will begin even after government promised that it will be before the end of the year.

The South African National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) and the Department of Transport have for some time claimed they are ready to switch on the system and begin the multibillion Rand project once President Jacob Zuma has signed a required bill into law.

Reports have also emerged that the President may be waiting until after next year's elections to sign the required bill.

The case is expected to cost Outa more than R12.5 million.

He says despite this, the organisation is ready to proceed with today's case.

"We've had to work hard to get here. But I think society has come to the party, both business and the public at large, to help us to get as far as we have and we're in awe."

Meanwhile, the alliance says it's too early to speculate whether it will need to fight the e-toll battle in the Constitutional Court, saying for now it only wants to focus on winning today's challenge.

"We'll cross that bridge when we get there. There's a Constitutional Court and we can appeal and they can also appeal, but I don't think we should predict anything."

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