The Africa Report: 16 September

EWN’s Africa Correspondent Jean-Jacques Cornish reports on the day’s top African news

The Church of Nigeria Anglican Communion. Picture Source: www.facebook.com/CONAbuja

KIDNAPPERS RELEASE SENIOR NIGERIAN CLERIC

Archbishop Ignatius Kattey, one of Nigeria's most senior clerics, has been released after being kidnapped and held for just over a week.

Kattey, the head of the Anglican Church in Port Harcourt, and his wife Beatrice were kidnapped on 6 September for unknown reasons.

Beatrice Kattey was released a few hours later, and Kattey a week without any ransom having been paid.

The predominantly Christian Port Harcourt is located in the oil-rich south near the Niger Delta where oil-industry related kidnappings are a commonplace.

In 2012, Coordinating Minister for the Economy and Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala's mother was also kidnapped in the south and held for five days.

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TWO DIE IN RWANDA GRENADE ATTACK

A grenade attack that was set off at a busy market place in Kigali on Friday has left two people dead and 14 wounded, ahead of the parliamentary vote.

The first attack on Friday killed one person and wounded 14 and the second, set off on Saturday, killed another and wounded eight more people.

The attacks occurred ahead of the Rwandan parliamentary vote on Monday which President Paul Kagame is expected to win.

The two indiscriminate attacks follow blasts in March and July this year as well as one in 2012 where 22 people were found guilty and subsequently jailed.

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MEDIA BLACKOUT FOR MUBARAK TRIAL

Egyptian judge, Mahmoud el-Rachidi, has ordered a media blackout for the October phase of ousted president Hosni Mubarak's retrial.

El-Rachidi cited state security as the reason for the blackout that bars journalists from the court house and forbids them from quoting lawyers.

Witness testimonies are another reason for the blackout.

Mubarak, who is on trial with his sons, had been sentenced to life in jail for his complicity in the killings of hundreds during the 2011 Arab Spring revolts.

A retrial was granted after Mubarak appealed against his sentence and his defence lawyers are expected to make a case that the Muslim Brotherhood is in fact to blame for the killings.

The next phase of the retrial will be held from 19 October to the 21st.