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The Africa Report: 16 August

EWN’s Africa Correspondent Jean-Jacques Cornish reports on the day’s top African news

US President Barack Obama on the phone about the situation in Egypt. Picture: Twitter / @whitehouse

EGYPT: INTERNATIONAL CONDEMNATION UNSUCCESSFUL, OBAMA'S OPTIONS FEW

The violent situation in Egypt has not subsided despite international condemnation of the security crackdown that has seen the death toll increase to more than 600 since Wednesday.

Despite global criticism, interim Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi has deemed the move as acceptable for any "self-respecting state".

US President, Barack Obam has led the condemnation of the state violence against supporters of deposed leader Mohamed Morsi and his backers the Muslim Brotherhood.

On Thursday, President Obama interrupted his family vacation on Martha's Vineyard to deliver a statement, saying the US deplored violence against civilians and condemned the steps taken by the interim government.

He said government will work with all those in Egypt who support a future of stability that rests on the foundation of justice and peace.

However, what Obama still didn't say was that the situation in Egypt was the result of a coup d'état.

If he is to admit to the overthrow of a democratic government, Obama will have to stop the US's annual military aid and assistance to Egypt worth $1.3 billion.

This is undesirable for the US as the cornerstone of its policies with the Middle East is built on Egypt and its access to the Suez Canal.

Obama is facing pressure from the international world, most specifically Turkey, and from within the Republicans.

OBAMA INVITES JONATHAN FOR TALKS ON TERRORISM IN AFRICA

Amongst all the pressure and criticism aimed at President Obama, an invite has been extended to Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, to visit New York for a discussion that will focus on terrorism in Africa.

Jonathan, who is faced with many headaches brought about by Islamist militants Boko Haram, has accepted.

The invitation was delivered by the Under Secretary for Political Affairs, Wendy Sherman.

He will be travelling to New York in September.

Like with South Africa and the US, Nigeria will enter into a bi-national commission which will include discussions about good governance, education, and agriculture.

CAMEROON ASSUMES FULL SOVEREIGNTY OF BAKASSI PENINSULA

In a United Nations approved agreement, Nigeria and Cameroon have agreed to the establishment of a transitional regime that will see the latter claim full sovereignty of the Bakassi Peninsula.

In 2008, Nigeria gave up the territory and took the position that once a transition was complete, Cameroon could take full sovereignty of the oil-rich area.

Those currently living in the area, most of which are Nigerian fishermen, will most likely have to apply for special resident certificates or register for Cameroon citizenship as taxes now need to be paid to the Cameroonians.

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