Pro and anti-Morsi protesters clash

Police fired teargas at protesters backing ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

Egyptian supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood rallying in support of deposed president Mohamed Morsi clash with police outside the elite Republican Guards base in Cairo early on July 8, 2013. Picture: AFP /Mahmoud Khaled

CAIRO - An Egyptian woman and a 13-year-old boy were killed when supporters and opponents of ousted Islamist President Mohamed Morsi clashed in the Nile Delta town of Mansoura, the website of state-run newspaper Al-Ahram said on Saturday.

Thousands of Morsi supporters took to the streets of Egyptian cities on Friday to demand the reinstatement of the Islamist leader who was removed by the army on 3 July after mass protests.

Egyptian soldiers fired tear gas at Morsi supporters who were marching near the presidential palace compound in Cairo, state news agency MENA reported.

NEW GOVT GETS TO WORK

Interim head of state Adli Mansour, the burly judge leading the army-backed administration, swore in 33 mainly liberal and technocratic ministers at the presidential palace earlier this week.

He did not include a single minister representing either of Egypt's main Islamist groups that have won five straight elections since 2011.

The Brotherhood rejected the interim government led by Mansour and Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi, a veteran liberal economist.

"It's an illegitimate government, an illegitimate prime minister, an illegitimate cabinet," said Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad.

"We don't recognise anyone in it. We don't even recognise their authority as representatives of the government."

The ministers took up their posts hours after seven people were killed and more than 260 wounded when Brotherhood supporters clashed with police in central Cairo and nearby Giza.

The deaths took the number of people killed in clashes since Morsi's overthrow to at least 99.

The interim government has a daunting task ahead to drag the Egyptian economy out of its torpor, after two and a half years of upheaval left state coffers and food stocks running dangerously low.