Bogus Boys's actions against the law -copyright lawyer

The Counterfeiting Act makes provision for both sentences and for fines to be imposed.

The Counterfeiting Act makes provision for both sentences and for fines to be imposed. Picture: Sxc.hu

JOHANNESBURG - The group responsible for putting up fake _The Star _newspaper posters around Johannesburg has been warned what it's doing is against the law.

The organisation, which calls itself the Bogus Boys, says it's putting up the fake posters to draw attention to its concerns for freedom of expression in the country.

Bogus Boys has claimed the group buying the newspaper and the Independent were merely a front for the ANC.

But copyright lawyer Professor Owen Dean says it's breaking the Counterfeiting Act.

"The act makes provision for both sentences and for fines to be imposed."

Recently several fake posters appeared in various parts of the city with The Star branding.

A man, who met with Eyewitness News on condition of anonymity said they were doing this for noble reasons.

"We believe that freedom of expression in this country is under threat. There's the 'secrecy bill,' there's the takeover of The Star by what seems to be an ANC consortium."

However, The Star's editor Makhudu Sefara said if the group had information about the consortium they should make it public.

"Instead of fighting this thing properly, they go and print posters that cause confusion."

The Bogus Boys said this was the first step in a long campaign.

On Wednesday, the _IOL _website was hacked by another group calling itself Africa Anonymous.

To read the Bogus Boys's statement click here.