'Dialogue on e-tolls should continue'

The Supreme Court of Appeal is due to hear the next phase of Outa's legal challenge on 25 September.

A motorist uses the N12 highway, a proposed toll road in Johannesburg. Picture: Werner Beukes/SAPA.

JOHANNESBURG - Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe's office said just because e-tolling is launching soon doesn't mean dialogue about the project should grind to a halt.

Motlanthe is due to meet church leaders on Friday in Pretoria to discuss their public challenge against the multibillion system.

This week the Opposition to Urban Tolling Alliance (Outa) made an urgent appeal for funding saying they must raise a R1 million in three weeks or face the possibility of having to abandon their legal case.

Roads agency Sanral said Outa should enter politics if it wishes to change policy decisions.

Motlanthe's spokesperson Thabo Masebe said churches were part of initial meetings chaired by the deputy president.

"We can't stop talking to people, it is important to talk to people because there might be misunderstandings on the basis of how we communicate."

The Supreme Court of Appeal is due to hear the next phase of Outa's legal challenge on 25 September.

Meanwhile, Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) and the churches are some of the organisations who are opposed to the controversial system.

Last week, Cosatu led a drive-slow in Gauteng against e-tolling.

The trade union federation believes the system will have a negative impact on the working class.