The Africa Report: 15 April

EWN's Africa Correspondent, Jean-Jacques Cornish, reports on the day's top African news.

Somalia's President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud looks on in Mogadishu on 10 September, 2012. Picture: AFP

PRETORIA - DEADLY ATTACK IN MOGADISHU

On Sunday, militants carried out a suicide attack in the Somali capital city of Mogadishu.

Radical Islamist militant group, Al-Shabaab, hit the Mogadishu Supreme Court and detonated a bomb on the road toward the airport, in a coordinated wave of violence that left at least 20 people dead.

Al-Shabaab has claimed responsibility for the attacks in the area that they had controlled for many years.

These two attacks - fulfilling threats of guerrilla violence by Al-Shabaab - are the first since being driven out of Mogadishu 18 months ago.

Though there had been sporadic attacks since then, security around Mogadishu had been considered much improved.

ONE STEP FORWARD, TWO STEPS BACK

These terror attacks have come at an otherwise positive time for Somalia.

On Saturday, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) had finally recognised Somalia's government, a first in 22 years.

Thus, Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamoud, the first Somali president the IMF and other Western institutions and governments will engage with since the 1991 overthrow of Mohamed Siad Barre, has a tough job ahead.

THE NEW SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has reportedly predicted an approximate six percent growth in sub-Saharan Africa.

This growth is unmatched by most other developed markets such as in Asia.

International auditing firm, KPMG, have released a study wherein they report a more than $3 billion return for equity companies investing in Africa in 2011.

Whilst the West continues to fear corruption-ridden sub-Sahara, businesses in China are lapping up investment opportunities.

However, American law firms are opening up with many in Johannesburg, with the aim of resolving the corruption issues in Africa.