Assad chemical arms plan blocked by Moscow

Moscow reportedly block Syria’s Bashar al-Assad’s plans to use chemical weapons against his enemies.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Picture: AFP

BEIRUT - Increasingly under pressure by rebels intent on unseating him, Bashar al-Assad has considered using chemical weapons against his enemies but Washington and Moscow have formed an unlikely alliance to force him to abandon such plans.

Analysts and diplomats across the region and beyond do not doubt that the Assad government, recoiling from a devastating attack on its security establishment last week and struggling to contain rebel offensives across Syria, is capable of using agents such as Sarin gas if its survival is at stake.

Yet some believe that the government's unprecedented admission that it possesses a chemical stockpile, although in safe storage and only to be deployed against "external aggressors", is an attempt to allay international alarm that might prompt outside intervention to secure the weapons.

"They have a keen instinct for regime survival and this is an issue which didn't play well for them, which would really bring serious consequences, not the type of stuff we have been seeing so far from the international community", said Salman al-Shaikh of the Brookings Doha centre.

"I think they wanted to move quickly to take us away from that, to reassure in many ways.

"This regime is capable of anything, but in this case it felt there may well be consequences, that they are perhaps crossing some red lines."

There has been a barrage of warnings about Syria's chemical arsenal this month, especially strident from the United States and Israel, but accompanied by firm but private advice from Russia, Assad's main international ally, to put an end to speculation he might use it.

One Western diplomat in the region said: "There was talk of them using it two weeks ago, but the Russians intervened quickly to stop him.

"If you think how desperate these people are and what they have done in the past, you have to assume they would be prepared to use it. All of us think he (Assad) is capable of using it and will do it if he was pushed to the wall," the diplomat said, referring to credible reports that Assad was preparing to use Sarin gas against Syrian rebels.

But "the Russians got hold of him and told him 'don't even think about it'".

SHARED INTEREST

The diplomat believes Syria's statement, by foreign ministry spokesman Jihad Makdissi, was put out at Russia's insistence.

Despite the diplomatic "debacle" over Syria at the UN Security Council, where Moscow has vetoed tougher action against Damascus, "there is a clear shared interest between Russia and the United States to control the chemical weapons", he said.

"The Israelis are pretty serious about trying to stop it happening, and the Americans too," the envoy said.

Diplomats said the United States, Israel and Western powers were in close contact on how to deal with the nightmarish eventuality of Assad losing control and his chemical weapons falling into the hands of militant groups -- al-Qaeda style Sunni Jihadi insurgents or Assad's pro-Iranian Shi'ite Lebanese fighters from Hezbollah.

Israel has publicly discussed military action to prevent Syrian chemical weapons or missiles from reaching Hezbollah.

Some Western intelligence sources suggested that Hezbollah and Iran's Revolutionary Guards, both close allies of Syria, have sent some special units to back Assad in his fight against Sunni insurgents and might get hold of the chemical weapons in the case of a total collapse of government authority.

Hezbollah, backed by Syria and Iran, has tried to distance itself publicly from the Syrian quagmire but it believes a defeat for Syria would mean the group might be targeted next.

Asked whether Hezbollah would try to obtain Syria's chemical weapons, one diplomat said: "If you think of this as a fight to the death, either with Sunnis or Israelis or both, you'd have an interest in trying to get your hands on chemical weapons.

"It's one more deterrent against Israel and a big stick to wave," he said.

President Barack Obama said on Monday that Assad would be held accountable if he made the "tragic mistake" of using his chemical weapons.

Washington said it was keeping a close eye on Syria's chemical stockpiles and was "actively consulting with Syria's neighbours and friends to underscore their common concern about the security of these weapons, and the Syrian government's obligation to secure them".