De Lille won't engage violent protesters

Patricia de Lille said she would only talk to Sir Lowry's Pass residents once they halted violent protests.

Women and children sing and dance during a second day of a housing protest in Sir Lowry's Pass Village on 10 May 2012.

CAPE TOWN - Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille on Friday again reiterated she would only talk to Sir Lowry's Pass residents once they halted violent protests.

Two days of service delivery demonstrations, this week, were marred by clashes with police.

Locals also threw petrol bombs at the area's police station.

De Lille visited Sir Lowry's Pass on Thursday but said she would not engage with residents who resort to violence.

Seven people were arrested and charged with public violence, when hundreds of residents clashed with police.

Irate residents claimed their community had been ignored for 10 years.

They complained of infrastructure, limited access to water and electricity.

De Lille promised to return to the area Sunday when Premier Helen Zille and the ANC councillor are expected to address residents' complaints.

Meanwhile, the protesters accused the police of brutality against them.

One woman told Eyewitness News her physically-disabled son was arrested while on his way to the local shop.

At the same time, Minister of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs Richard Baloyi expressed his concern with the current violent service delivery protest.

The minister said political agendas were behind some violent service delivery protest, but he also said in some cases the complaints were genuine.

Earlier this week, Mpumalanga protesters torched municipality property while protesting for water.