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American activists fly out of Egypt

U.S. pro-democracy activists flew out of Egypt on Thursday after the authorities lifted a travel ban, a...

Egyptian anti-government protesters wave their shoes outside the state television building in Cairo on 11 February 2011. Picture: AFP

U.S. pro-democracy activists flew out of Egypt on Thursday after the authorities lifted a travel ban, a move that is likely to defuse the worst row between Washington and Cairo in decades.

Egyptian authorities had accused the campaigners, including the son of U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, of working for groups receiving illegal foreign funding and prevented them from leaving the country.

U.S. officials said the case, as long as it was unresolved, jeopardised $1.3 billion in annual military aid, a cash transfer that began flowing after Egypt made peace with Israel in 1979. Washington's ties with Cairo were a pillar of its Middle East policy under U.S. ally Hosni Mubarak, who was deposed last year.

A judge said on Wednesday the ban had been lifted. "They (the activists) have left," an airport official told Reuters on Thursday.

The group of 15 people, included eight Americans, among them Sam LaHood, three Serbs, two Germans, one Norwegian and one Palestinian, Egypt's official news agency said. Airport sources said they left on a U.S. plane sent to get them.

The group later arrived in Cyprus, where they were met by U.S. embassy staff and driven away from Larnaca airport in a minibus without speaking to a Reuters reporter. It was not clear where they were being taken and U.S. diplomats referred questions to the State Department in Washington.

Cyprus airport sources said the group's aircraft was scheduled to depart on Friday but there was no information on its destination or passengers.

The United States expressed continued concern over Egypt's crackdown on pro-democracy groups.

"We are very pleased that the Egyptian courts have now lifted the travel ban on our NGO employees. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said in Washington. The group were on their way home, she said.

"The departure of our people doesn't resolve the legal case or the larger issues concerning the NGOs," Nuland said.

"We remain deeply concerned about the prosecution of NGOs in Egypt and the ultimate outcome of the legal process, and we will keep working with the Egyptian government on these issues."

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had said on Wednesday she expected a swift resolution to the row.

Judge Abdel Moez Ibrahim told Reuters on Wednesday that, after an appeal by those charged, the case was switched from a criminal court to one handling misdemeanours where the maximum penalty was a fine, not jail.

With that, those involved could post bail of 2 million Egyptian pounds ($330,000) each and the travel ban would be lifted. The NGOs posted bail for their employees.

Sixteen of the 43 people charged are Americans. Some of the U.S. activists had sought refuge in the U.S. embassy, which had no comment on the case.

Egyptian politicians and analysts said ties with the United States would likely recover without major long-term damage. Relations have been strained at a sensitive point when Egypt makes the transition from army to civilian rule.

Timeline

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