20°C / 22°C
  • Thu
  • 14°C
  • 0°C
  • Fri
  • 15°C
  • 2°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 1°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 2°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 3°C
  • Tue
  • 16°C
  • 3°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 18°C
  • 11°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 9°C
  • Sun
  • 25°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 16°C
  • 3°C
  • Fri
  • 16°C
  • 3°C
  • Sat
  • 17°C
  • 3°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 5°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 5°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 4°C
  • Thu
  • 16°C
  • 0°C
  • Fri
  • 16°C
  • 1°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 1°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 3°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 4°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 5°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 23°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 23°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 25°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 24°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 10°C
  • Thu
  • 22°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 16°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 17°C
  • 3°C
  • Fri
  • 17°C
  • 3°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 3°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 4°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 5°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Thu
  • 16°C
  • -1°C
  • Fri
  • 16°C
  • 0°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 1°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 3°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 3°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 3°C
  • Thu
  • 17°C
  • 5°C
  • Fri
  • 18°C
  • 5°C
  • Sat
  • 19°C
  • 5°C
  • Sun
  • 20°C
  • 6°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 5°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 26°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 22°C
  • 14°C

Zimbabwe public workers reject higher salary offer

The government agreed last week to raise salaries by 10% for the army, police and other civil servants from July.

Picture: Supplied

HARARE - Zimbabwe’s public sector workers have rejected an improved salary offer of 15% from President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s government and want wages for the lowest paid employees to more than double, the main public sector union said on Tuesday.

The government agreed last week to raise salaries by 10% for the army, police and other civil servants from July, when Zimbabwe is expected to hold its first general election since Robert Mugabe left power last year.

Apex Council, the union which represents all government workers, said the government’s higher offer on Monday was still below the poverty datum line (PDL) used to assess whether a person is deemed poor.

Zimbabwe’s PDL is $591, while the lowest government worker earns $253 a month.

The southern African nation already spends more than 90% of its national budget on salaries and pensions, but Mnangagwa is trying hard to curb strikes by public workers before the elections, whose date he is yet to announce.

The new president, who came to power following a de facto army coup against 94-year-old Mugabe in November, has already faced public sector anger when doctors and nurses went on strike in March and April.

“We would like to urge the government to improve the salary of the lowest paid to PDL,” Apex Council chairperson Cecilia Alexander said. “We have not yet reached a deadlock. Dialogue is still ongoing,” Alexander added.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus