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Mass strike expected over proposed amendments to labour laws

The South African Federation of Trade Unions (Saftu) says workers have to stand together to challenge what they are calling a poverty wage.

Trade unionist Zwelinzima Vavi addressing anti-minimum wage protesters in Cape Town. Picture: @Numsa_Media/Twitter

CAPE TOWN - Thousands of workers across the country plan to take to the streets later this month, in a protest against proposed amendments to the country’s labour laws.

This includes the planned introduction of a national minimum wage, which has been postponed from its original 1 May implementation date.

The South African Federation of Trade Unions (Saftu) says workers have to stand together to challenge what they are calling a poverty wage.

The unions say that a proposed R20 an hour wage will further entrench poverty.

They are also opposed to changes to strike laws.

Numsa spokesperson Phakamile Hlubi-Majola says that the proposed amendments will curtail workers’ rights to protest.

Thousands of union members are expected to take to the streets next Wednesday.

“It will culminate with a mega strike on 25 April which is a protected national general strike under section 77 under the labour law.”

Meanwhile, Parliament’s labour portfolio committee will meet this week to discuss public input on a national minimum wage.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)

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