20°C / 22°C
  • Sun
  • 27°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 28°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 28°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 15°C
  • 10°C
  • Wed
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 10°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 31°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 10°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 26°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 20°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 18°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 24°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 15°C
  • 8°C
  • Wed
  • 16°C
  • 7°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 5°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 13°C
  • 9°C
  • Wed
  • 14°C
  • 8°C
  • Thu
  • 18°C
  • 10°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 34°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 8°C
  • Mon
  • 32°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 28°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 30°C
  • 9°C
  • Fri
  • 31°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 28°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 32°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 16°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 17°C
  • 10°C
  • Thu
  • 17°C
  • 9°C
  • Fri
  • 19°C
  • 10°C

'Lincoln in the Bardo' wins 2017 Man Booker prize

George Saunders is the second consecutive US writer to win the prize after the rules were changed in 2014 to allow authors of any book written in English and published in the UK to compete.

US author George Saunders holds his book and the award for the 2017 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, at the Guildhall in central London on 17 October 2017. Picture: AFP

LONDON - American author George Saunders has won the 2017 Man Booker Prize, a high-profile literary award, for his first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, a fictional account of US President Abraham Lincoln burying his young son.

In his acceptance speech, Saunders, 58, noted that “we live in a strange time,” adding he saw the key question of the era being whether society responded to events with “exclusion and negative projection and violence,” or “with love.”

Saunders was the second consecutive American writer to win the prize after the rules were changed in 2014 to allow authors of any book written in English and published in the United Kingdom to compete.

His novel, set in 1862, a year into the American Civil war, is a blend of historical accounts and imaginative fiction, which sees Lincoln’s son Willie, who died in the White House at age 11, in “Bardo” - a Tibetan form of purgatory.

The judging panel, led by author and member of Britain’s House of Lords Lola Young, praised the “deeply moving” book, saying it was “utterly original”.

Saunders was presented with his award by the Duchess of Cornwall.

Last year, American Paul Beatty became the first American to win the award, for his novel The Sellout a biting satire on race relations in the United States.

Other previous winners have included this year’s Nobel Prize-winning novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, Salman Rushdie, Iris Murdoch and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood.

The award was previously open only to writers from Britain, Ireland, Zimbabwe or countries in the British Commonwealth. The winner receives a £50,000 cash prize.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus