20°C / 22°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 7°C
  • Sat
  • 21°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 15°C
  • 5°C
  • Mon
  • 16°C
  • 3°C
  • Tue
  • 15°C
  • 4°C
  • Wed
  • 18°C
  • 4°C
  • Fri
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 9°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 9°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 8°C
  • Sat
  • 23°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 8°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 5°C
  • Wed
  • 20°C
  • 6°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 5°C
  • Sat
  • 24°C
  • 7°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 4°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 4°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 2°C
  • Wed
  • 20°C
  • 3°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 19°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 17°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 10°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 9°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 18°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 16°C
  • 10°C
  • Sat
  • 15°C
  • 7°C
  • Sun
  • 20°C
  • 6°C
  • Mon
  • 24°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 27°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 15°C
  • 11°C
  • Sat
  • 15°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 11°C
  • Fri
  • 25°C
  • 8°C
  • Sat
  • 25°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 20°C
  • 9°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 7°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 6°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 6°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Sun
  • 15°C
  • 4°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 3°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 3°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 6°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 7°C
  • Sat
  • 22°C
  • 7°C
  • Sun
  • 15°C
  • 8°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 7°C
  • Tue
  • 19°C
  • 4°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 4°C
  • Fri
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Sat
  • 15°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 10°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 17°C
  • 12°C

Natural deaths in SA linked to unhealthy lifestyles

More than half of all natural deaths in the country can be linked to diseases resulting from unhealthy lifestyles.

Picture: Freeimages.com

CAPE TOWN - More than half of all natural deaths in the country can be linked to diseases resulting from unhealthy lifestyles.

Statistics South Africa info shows non-communicable diseases remain a serious problem.

The Government Employees Medical Scheme (Gems) says this puts enormous pressure on South Africa’s health sector.

Stats SA has released data that indicates non-communicable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension, were responsible for 55% of all deaths in 2015.

Doctor Guni Goolab, the principal officer of Gems, says globally, diseases like these are on the rise.

"Predominantly, the underlying factors related to these conditions is what we call ‘lifestyle-related diseases’. The way we eat and live our lifestyles has definitely contributed."

He says the incidence of these health conditions can be limited by such measures, such as a basic fitness regime and healthy diet.

"Moderate changes in our eating plans, like avoiding salt on our food and cutting back on carbohydrates, can make a big difference."

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus