20°C / 22°C
  • Sat
  • 22°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 5°C
  • Mon
  • 16°C
  • 5°C
  • Tue
  • 14°C
  • 4°C
  • Wed
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 6°C
  • Sat
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 10°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 9°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 20°C
  • 9°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 24°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 9°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 6°C
  • Wed
  • 20°C
  • 7°C
  • Thu
  • 22°C
  • 8°C
  • Sat
  • 24°C
  • 7°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 4°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 4°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 6°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 4°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 17°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 8°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 15°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 11°C
  • Tue
  • 22°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 25°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 9°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 9°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 7°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 7°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 8°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 5°C
  • Sun
  • 16°C
  • 4°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 4°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 3°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 6°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 7°C
  • Sat
  • 22°C
  • 7°C
  • Sun
  • 16°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 6°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 5°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 7°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 18°C
  • 12°C

Up, up & away: Nasa to launch SA satellite

The satellite was a collaborative development by Stellenbosch University and an incubation company called CubeSpace.

The ZA-AeroSat which will be launched by Nasa. Picture: Facebook.

CAPE TOWN - South African scientists are waiting with great anticipation for their Nano satellite to be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa).

The first trip to the international space station was due on Tuesday but was delayed due to a hydraulic problem with the launcher.

The satellite was a collaborative development by Stellenbosch University and an incubation company called CubeSpace.

Posted by CubeSpace on Monday, 27 March 2017

Twelve years of research and a further three years of development led to the creation of the 2kg shoebox size satellite.

CubeSpace's Mike-Alec Kearney says the Nano satellite will be used in conjunction with other satellites.

“These satellites will fly in a ring around the earth and do measurements of the earth’s atmosphere. There’s a sensor at the front of the satellite, which measures atomic oxygen in the earth’s atmosphere and builds a model of the earth’s atmosphere.”

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus