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[WATCH] Drone footage shows state of Theewaterskloof Dam

A video shows how badly Theewaterskloof Dam, one of the largest reservoirs for drinking water in the Mother City, has dried up.

Theewaterskloof Dam. Picture: Johnny Miller/Code for Africa.

CAPE TOWN – Imagine opening your tap and not a single drop of water comes out.

How would you bath, cook or get around to do anything without water?

Photographer and videographer Johnny Miller, who’s funded by Code for Africa, shared drone footage to show the state of the Theewaterskloof Dam, which he say is the largest reservoir for drinking water in the Mother City.

The City of Cape Town’s dam levels are currently at 42,5 %, but it could drop to at least 20% in the next few months.

This means that dam levels could be at a level of approximately 20% by the start of winter.

In an interview with Cape Talk host Kienno Kammies, Miller said the city was facing a crisis.

“This is a crisis. A lot of people are throwing that word around but it’s definitely a crisis.”

He hopes the footage will help people to realise that they need to save water.

“From what I understand, it’s very hard to get out the last 10% [of water] from a dam because you’re dealing with a muddy substance at the bottom.”

While the City has implemented level 3 water restrictions and could step it up with level 3B restrictions soon, water consumption remains high.

Collective consumption for the week ending 15 January 2017 was up to 890 million litres per day. This was up from 859 million litres per day the previous week, and was 90 million litres per day above targeted levels.

The city does not expect run out of water before the next rainy season but constant water usage above the target of 800 million litres per day of collective use, as has been the case, is not sustainable, the City said in a statement.

“We have the ability now to turn this situation around. And we will only be able to do this if water use is reduced and members of the public help us to do so.”

Officials have urged residents to avoid any finger-pointing or buck-passing on this issue and to rather assist in saving water.

Residents can report water wastage via email or visit the City’s website for more information.

Footage and images courtesy of Johnny Miller/Code for Africa.

Is enough being done to save water in the Cape Town? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

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